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American Gods

Shadow Moon

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Presenting Shadow Moon

A man with an improbable name on an even more improbable journey.

Shadow Moon

Shadow Moon

Shadow, we're going to be releasing you a couple of days early. There's no good way to say this so I'll put it plain. Your wife, she died in the early hours of this morning.

- Prison Warden

When Shadow Moon is released from prison, he meets the mysterious Mr. Wednesday and a storm begins to brew. Little does Shadow know, this storm will change the course of his entire life.

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Left adrift by the recent, tragic death of his wife, he boards a flight home and is suddenly introduced to Mr. Wednesday a conman but in reality one of the older gods.

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He soon becomes bodyguard and travelling partner to Mr. Wednesday. They set off on their cross country mission to build an alliance of Old Gods and defend their existence in this new America, whilst reclaiming some of the influence that they’ve lost.

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“When we first find Shadow he's a shadow of his former self. He lacks that energy and that purpose in life…until he’s taken under the wing by a mysterious conman in Mr. Wednesday. It’s only truly then, when Mr. Wednesday starts showing him and trying to get him to believe in this other world that’s out there, we really see Shadow come back into his own and gain his personality of old.”

- Ricky Whittle who plays Shadow Moon

Ricky Whittle on Shadow Moon

Ricky Whittle talks about his character, Shadow Moon, and what we can expect to see of him over the series.

Ricky Whittle on Training For Fight Scenes

Ricky Whittle on Training For Fight Scenes

“I trained for two months before this show. I had to put on 26lbs. So, Fremantle took me to Unbreakable gym in Los Angeles, and I worked with Brett Bartholomew and Jay Gazer. It’s an intense training regime that involved 4000 calories a day, four hours of gym every day, and we did it. We put on 26lbs. We were training alongside NFL players and MMA fighters.  

It’s been tough to maintain that throughout filming, but it’s been a lot of fun. A lot of stunts. We have an incredible stunt co-ordinator in Branko Racki, and he has a wonderful team that have  helped us throughout the Mad Sweeney Shadow fights, the Shadow and the Children fights in the field. Even being hung from a tree, it’s his responsibility to make sure I'm safe. I have a stunt double in Jason Gosbee, who is awesome. He’s done huge things. Suicide Squad’s his most recent film. There’s a whole team. It really does take a village, and I feel very blessed to have a great team behind me.”

The Importance of Coins to Shadow

The Importance of Coins to Shadow

Ricky Whittle on the importance of coins in the show, and the process of learning the roll.

Why are coin tricks important to Shadow?

The coin tricks are funny because the more we learn about Shadow, the more we learn how special he is. He drifts towards these coin tricks and later on we reveal that he doesn’t need to trick anyone. The power is already within him to do real stuff, but obviously, that’s not something you’ll find out until later on. For now, it’s kind of that link to the other side. The illusions and the manipulations.


So, it keeps his mind busy and it allows him to focus?

Yes. The coins, in prison they kept him busy, they kept his mind focused. When he gets nervous or anxious it calms him. We see Shadow on numerous occasions, where things get a little bit crazy, reverting to his coin to soothe his nerves. A coin trick that I took two months to master. It took me forever. It was so hard, and then when we got here they said they could’ve just CGI’ed  it, so time well spent. 


So, you learnt the roll?

I learnt the roll. I went onto YouTube and I started off with the Liberty dollar.  The art department gave me the Liberty dollar, and I was there for a couple of  hours a day, just learning a roll. Once I got that nailed, I got to set and they said, “Oh, we’re going to give you a slug, because you wouldn't have a Liberty dollar in prison. So, here’s a new thing.” It’s impossible. It’s completely different. So, I had to relearn it with a different size and weight coin, and I also have to do it with a moon coin...so it’s been tough. I’ve been in training.

It is Always Going to be Tails

Shadow finds himself agreeing to work for Mr. Wednesday when they meet again in The Crocodile Bar. 

Neil Gaiman on Shadow

“Oh, my boy, that is one outstandingly improbable name.” Mr. Wednesday. 

An improbable name and an even more improbable journey. But who is he, in the words of the man who created him?

Ricky Whittle

Ricky Whittle

is Shadow Moon

Ricky Whittle previously starred as Lincoln, one of the Grounders, on The CW’s critically acclaimed drama “The 100.” A native of Oldham, Greater Manchester, England, Whittle is best known for his role as Calvin Valentine in the popular series “Hollyoaks.” Other television credits include roles on “Mistresses,” “Single Ladies,” “NCIS,” and BBC One’s “Holby City.” 

On the big screen, Whittle appeared in the feature film Austenland, opposite Keri Russell, from Producers Stephanie Meyer and Jerusha Hess. In 2008, Whittle appeared on a celebrity edition of “The Weakest Link,” reaching the final round. In 2009, he was as a contestant on the BBC One reality television series “Strictly Come Dancing,” paired with Australian Professional Dancer Natalie Lowe. Whittle made it through to the finals of the competition, and competed against Television Presenter Chris Hollins. 

Whittle is the son of former Royal Air Force Serviceman Harry Whittle and grew up travelling around the world, with a home base near Reading, Berkshire. A keen sportsman, Whittle represented England and the United Kingdom at youth level in football and rugby. While at university, he began modeling and eventually became the face of a Reebok campaign in 2000.

 This brought him to the attention of casting agents for Sky One's football soap opera “Dream Team.” He currently resides in Los Angeles.

Mr. Wednesday

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Presenting Mr. Wednesday

What is this mysterious conman up to?

Mr. Wednesday

Mr. Wednesday

You wouldn't believe in me if I told you.

- Mr. Wednesday

Chief amongst the Old Gods. A crafty and endlessly charming conman, he is full of perverse wisdom, curious magic and grand plans.

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Mr. Wednesday hires ex-con Shadow Moon to be his bodyguard as he journeys across America, using his charms to recruit others like him as he prepares for the ultimate battle for power.

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Mr Wednesday is really Odin, the Norse God, God of all Gods, Allfather, God of War, Glad of War...He’s many men, and he’s got as many names as there are kinds of winds. He’s a modern day guy, but he’s a grifter, he’s a conman, and you don’t know why he’s hooked up with Shadow. I’m not going to give that away. What he needs is a bodyguard, to help him on his quest.

- Ian McShane who plays Mr. Wednesday

Ian McShane on Mr. Wednesday

Ian McShane talks about his character Mr. Wednesday - a mysterious conman with big plans.

Today's My Day

Mr. Wednesday and Shadow first meet on a plane. Is it fate that brings them together, or something else?

Neil Gaiman on Mr. Wednesday

“I’m a hustler, swindler, cheater, and liar.” American Gods author, Neil Gaiman, describes one of the most intriguing characters of the series.

An Interview with Ian McShane

An Interview with Ian McShane

Tell us About American Gods 

American Gods is a fabulous futuristic, set in present day America. Telling the story of the diaspora of settlers that came to America, who brought all kinds of gods with them, religions, beliefs.  

People come from all walks of life; they’re immigrants to America, bring all gods with them. You now have a pervading sense that the modern world has taken it over - you have a more secular America, which is inevitable.  

Mr. Wednesday, which is the character I play, hooks up with Shadow Moon, played by Ricky Whittle…after Shadow comes out of prison. You learn of this world, which appears normal, but abnormal things happen the entire time. 

And tell us about Mr. Wednesday 

He’s a modern day guy, but he’s a grifter, he’s a conman, and you don’t know why he’s hooked up with Shadow. I’m not going to give that away. What he needs is a bodyguard, to help him on his quest. He wants the Old Gods, who he thinks are being forgotten, gods of nature, gods of life - good gods that people rely on. They’re being given away to the more modern gods of technology, of science, of money, of the bankers.

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What do you think makes a god? 

Ordinary people believing in larger things, believing something will happen...Wednesday always said, which I think is not a bad line, “Whether you want to believe in a god or not...Good things happen because gods make good things… Be nice to your god and good things will happen. A little give and take.” 

[Mr. Wednesday is] calling, in a weird way, through this scorched-earth war policy he has, for a little more respect for everybody…A little more respect for everybody that came to America, just not the white Northern Europeans who suddenly descended and believed they invented the world.  

What does Mr. World represent? 

Mr. World represents everything. Media and Technical Boy - they’re parts of Mr World - but Mr. World is, if you like, the Bilderberg theory - the theory that there’s a group of people that actually control the world, that want everything to be the way it is…They like their information to be “what I want”. In other words, the control of information. So, we’re going back to another world where Wednesday says, “No, no, no, it’s not control. You want a freedom, so people can choose and react with each other in a natural way, in a humane way, on a belief level."  

Ian McShane

Ian McShane

is Mr. Wednesday

From a lawless saloon owner to the most feared pirate that ever sailed the seas, Ian McShane certainly has carved out quite the niche playing bad guys one would cross the street to avoid. That just might have changed in recent roles in which he starred as Amphiarus (part priest, part prophet, part warrior) opposite Dwayne Johnson in Hercules for Director Brett Ratner; a salsa dance instructor opposite Nick Frost in Cuban Fury for Director James Griffiths; the good king of the land in Jack the Giant Slayer for director Bryan Singer; and in Snow White and the Huntsman as the lead dwarf Beith opposite Kristen Stewart and Chris Hemsworth.

McShane just reprised his role as Winston (club owner/conceivable ex-assassin) opposite Keanu Reeves in John Wick: Chapter Two for Director Chad Stahelski and Lionsgate. He appeared in cameo roles in Sacha Baron Cohen’s new comedy Grimsby directed by Louis Leterrier for Sony, and in the highly touted Spanish Director Daniel Monzón’s film El Niño.

Next starring in Bolden! McShane playscorrupt Judge Perry for Writer/Director Dan Pritzker in the story about the life of jazz innovator Buddy Bolden; and as Leland, a retired sheriff with violent tendencies opposite Patrick Wilson in The Hollow Point for Director Gonzalo López-Gallego, Atlas Independent, and Relativity.

McShane starred in the worldwide billion-dollar blockbuster Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides as the fearsome pirate Blackbeard. He also starred as the conniving and manipulative, Waleran Bigod in the Emmy®-nominated “The Pillars of the Earth” for which he received a Golden Globe® Nomination for Best Actor in a Mini Series.

Highlights of his previous years in film include starring in and co-producing the motion picture 44 Inch Chest, lending his unique voice to the highly acclaimed animated features Coraline, Shrek the Third, Kung Fu Panda, and The Golden Compass.

His voice can next be heard as Umayya in the independent animated feature Bilal. He was also seen in Woody Allen's Scoop. In the critically acclaimed indie Sexy Beast, McShane gave another riveting performance by transforming himself into the dark, sinister, and very handsome character Teddy Bass, prompting one London writer to declare McShane, “the king of cool.” Earlier in his career he starred in favorites The Last of Sheila, Pussycat, Pussycat, I Love You, and If It’s Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium.

McShane has also enjoyed a long and creatively diverse career in both British and American television. He recently played Andrew Finney opposite Liev Schreiber on the critically acclaimed Showtime series “Ray Donovan.” McShane also recently appeared in the award-winning series “Game of Thrones” on HBO. One of his most significant roles includes Al Swearengen on HBO’s “Deadwood.” McShane earned the coveted Golden Globe Award for ‘Best Actor in a Television Drama.’ His charismatic and alluring performance also led him to 2005 Emmy® and SAG nominations for ‘Lead Actor’, as well as being voted by People Magazine in 2005 as ‘TV's Sexiest Villain.’ Following a wave of critical acclaim for “Deadwood,” he received the Television Critics Association's Award for ‘Individual Achievement in Drama’ and was named as one of GQ’s ‘Men of the Year,’ describing his character as “infectious” and “darkly irresistible.”

In the beginning of his career, McShane starred in “Roots,” followed by starring as Judas in NBC's “Jesus of Nazareth” directed by Franco Zeffirelli. He played the title role in Masterpiece Theatre's “Disraeli,” starred in the miniseries “A.D., Whose Life Is It Anyway?,” played Heathcliff in “Wuthering Heights,” and starred in Harold Pinter's Emmy®-Award winning “The Caretaker.” McShane also starred in NBC’s critically lauded drama, “Kings.” In the late 80’s he formed McShane Productions, which produced the much-adored “Lovejoy” for the BBC and A&E. “Lovejoy” gave McShane a vehicle to star in as well as produce and direct.

In addition to his screen work, McShane is a celebrated stage actor. In 2000 McShane returned to the West End in London to make his musical debut starring in The Witches of Eastwick as Darryl Van Horne. His varied stage career has included roles in Loot, The Admirable Crichton, The Glass Menagerie, and The Big Knife. He co-starred with Dame Judi Dench and Ian McKellen in The Promise, which successfully played London and was his Broadway debut. In Los Angeles, he starred in three productions at The Matrix Theatre, including the world premiere of Larry Atlas’ Yield of the Long Bond for which he received the Los Angeles Drama Critics’ Circle Award and Inadmissible Evidence and Betrayal. In 2008 McShane returned to Broadway to star in a revival of Harold Pinter’s The Homecoming for the 40th Anniversary of the play.

Born in Blackburn, England, Ian is the son of professional soccer player Harry McShane, who played for Manchester United, and Irene McShane. He attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art.

Laura Moon

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Presenting Laura Moon

Not quite dead, and on a serious mission. What's in store for Laura Moon?

Laura Moon

Laura Moon

Laura Moon is Shadow Moon’s ethereal wife. She dies unexpectedly just before Shadow’s release from prison. 

You've gotten yourself mixed up in some really weird shit, Shadow

- Laura Moon

Little does she know that her untimely death will lead her to an epiphany about her relationship and afford her a second chance to make amends.

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“Laura is Shadow’s wife. I think from his side of the relationship, their marriage is pretty great. I think he genuinely loves her and treats her incredibly well. From Laura’s side, she is there because she sort of thinks that is what she should be doing. She definitely doesn’t feel like this is the life that she had hoped for. And I don’t think that is any fault of Shadow’s. I just think that she is numb.”

- Emily Browning who plays Laura Moon.

Emily Browning on Laura Moon

Emily Browning discusses her complex character, Laura Moon, who has been developed significantly from the book. 

Emily Browning on Laura's Death

Emily Browning on Laura's Death

Episode four takes us on Laura Moon’s equally amazing and bizarre journey to her not-quite-dead self. Below, Emily Browning, talks us through the scene between her character, Laura, and Anubis - the Ancient Egyptian god of the dead and mummification.


Tell us about the scene between Anubis and Laura immediately after her death

Anubis goes for Laura’s heart. In typical Laura fashion, she kind of bats him away and is like, “No, that’s not happening.” She essentially says, “You want to weigh my heart against that feather. I can already tell you who wins,” because she’s not the kind of person who feels guilt for anything that she’s done, even though she’s done some really shitty things. She’s kind of a jerk, but she lived her life. She essentially says to Anubis, “There’s no need to weigh my heart, because I already know that it’s heavy because I lived. I did terrible things and I did good things, and I don’t want to be judged by anybody but myself.” I think that’s what sets off the chain of events that makes her this kind of anomaly... They call her an abomination, essentially because she just refuses to have judgement put down upon her.

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Would you say that this is the moment she finds her strength?

Yes.

So, who is Laura now?

Yes, I think she definitely finds her strength in that moment when she essentially chooses not to die, chooses not to be judged and punished accordingly. It’s not that she isn’t strong when she’s alive, I definitely don’t see her as a fragile character, but she just doesn’t have the energy to be strong.  She just doesn’t care, there’s nothing really in life that she’s fighting for. I think suddenly, when she’s faced with that – “You’re going to be judged and then you’re going to be sent to nothingness” – oddly, it’s kind of a wake-up call for her. She finds that strength and decides, “No, I’m not, I’m not. That’s not going to happen.”

She emerges from her grave and she sees this light in the distance. I don’t think she fully understands what it is, but she knows that she has to go towards it. She now has this new purpose of finding that light, and she finds it, and it’s Shadow. I think it’s sort of ironic for Laura because she definitely would never have been one of those girls who was all about true love and, “I want to get married and I want to have a family.” She’s so not a romantic. I think there is a little bit of irony there in the fact that she’s like, “I guess this is my purpose now. I guess it’s love, and it’s genuine.” I think it’s interesting because the whole show, in a sense, is about what people worship.

It’s kind of funny and great to me that...one of the angriest, darkest characters in the show, Laura, what she worships ends up being love, which I think is kind of cool because I think she so easily could have just been the sad, lost wife. I’m really glad that she’s not. I definitely wouldn’t be playing her if that was the case.

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What is Laura’s purpose now? 

I think Laura’s purpose after she comes back from the dead...is to find Shadow, to be able to tell him that, in fact, she does love him and she wants to be with him. I think the broader purpose is to protect him and watch over him, but I’m not sure she quite realises that yet. I don’t think it’s really until the end of the season that she realises that that’s her bigger purpose. I think her motivations, all the way up until the final episode, are fairly selfish. She just wants him back, and I think she gets increasingly frustrated by the fact that she can’t have him back. Again, she has very little self-awareness and very little empathy. 

It’s an interesting moment for her at least, when, at the end of that scene when they see each other in the motel room, she says, “Are you still mine, Puppy?” and he says, “No.” I don’t think she’s even heartbroken; I think she’s just confused. She’s like, “Yes, you are. You’re mine, you always have been. What are you talking about?” I think it’s really fun to play a character like that, because she’s not heartbroken, she’s not pining, she’s sort of just like, “You’re mine and you love me, so come here and love me.” I think it gives me room to do things that I’ve never done in a role before. It’s a really interesting, fun thing to play with, and it’s also a character that I don’t think I’ve ever seen before.

Neil Gaiman on Laura

“I lived my life good and bad.” Shadow Moon’s ethereal wife is a woman of many layers and cutting words. Here, Neil Gaiman tells us more about the character who is equal parts lethal and vulnerable.

Mad Sweeney, Laura, and the Lucky Coin

Mad Sweeney, Laura, and the Lucky Coin

Mad Sweeney is on a mission to get his back lucky coin after he mistakenly gives it to Shadow. Pablo Schreiber, who plays the down-on-his-luck leprechaun, explains why the coin is vital to Mad Sweeney's existence, and how - in his quest to get it - he forms an unlikely partnership with Laura Moon. 

What's the importance of Mad Sweeney's gold coin? And how does he lose it?  

Well, the importance of the coin is it's his luck, it's his life force, basically...So when he loses his lucky coin, which is his Sun coin, he loses all of his luck. And that's one of the great kinds of ironies and opens up a lot of comedy opportunities in this series, because obviously a leprechaun who's lost his luck is good fodder for sport. And so, the importance of it is that it's what keeps him going - it's what gives him his magic, it's what gives him his luck and his charm - and when he loses it, he's lost all of that. So it's imperative if he wants to be the demi-god that he has been for the last few hundred years he has to get his coin back. 

Why is Laura important to Mad Sweeney?  

Because she ends up with his lucky coin. Sweeney gives it to Shadow mistakenly [and then] Shadow takes that coin and drops it into the grave of his dead wife, Laura, and it ends up resurrecting her. So she ends up with his lucky coin in her chest and it's what brings her back to life. So that's why he needs to find Laura, in order to get his lucky coin back. But when he goes to her grave, she's not there and she has left the site of the grave and dug herself out. So then he has to track her down. 

And when he tracks her down he finds that...she now has incredible super-human strength and she begins to toss him around like a rag doll to great comedic effect. And that's the crux of their relationship, is that he needs the coin that she's got, but he can't take it from her. It has to be given of her own free will. So until she agrees to give the coin back, he can't take it. And besides the fact that…she's dead and has super-human strengths, she's way stronger than him and he can't take it back even if he wanted to. 

So they're kind of stuck as this odd couple, where she needs him, because he knows where Shadow is and he can take her to Shadow. And he needs her, because he's got her coin. 

What's in Store for Laura

Episode 4 - Git Gone - is all about Laura. Here's a sneak peak...

Emily Browning

Emily Browning

is Laura Moon

In a short time, Australian Actress Emily Browning has established herself as one of the industry’s most versatile and exciting young talents, balancing studio films with artful independent fare. 

Browning first received international recognition when she was cast as Violet Baudelaire in the 2004 film adaptation of the popular children’s book series, Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events. She received a 2005 Critics Choice Award nomination for ‘Best Young Actress’ from the Broadcast Film Critics Association on behalf of her performance, as well as a 2005 ‘Best Actress’ Award by the Australian Film Institute. 

In 2011, Browning starred in Julia Leigh’s art-house film Sleeping Beauty, which had its world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival. While the film received mixed reactions from critics and journalists for pushing the envelope, Browning received critical praise for her demanding performance. She was honored with the ‘Breakthrough Performer’ Award at the 2011 Hamptons International Film Festival and received a ‘Best Actress in a Leading Role’ nomination by the Film Critics Circle of Australia, as well as the Australian Film Critics Association. 

In 2014, Browning starred and sang in the musical feature film God Help the Girl, written and directed by Stuart Murdoch of the music group Belle and Sebastian. The film follows Eve (Browning), who escapes from a psychiatric hospital and makes her way to Glasgow, hoping to become a musician. God Help the Girl premiered in-competition in the World Cinema Dramatic Competition at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival, where it won the ‘Special Jury Prize’. That next month, the film served as the opening night film of the Generation’s SELECTION?? at the 64th Berlin International Film Festival. 

Browning most recently appeared opposite Tom Hardy in the criminal biopic Legend, which was written and directed by Brian Helgeland. Legend depicts the rise and fall of real-life twin brothers, Reggie and Ronnie Kray, who dominated organized crime in London during the 1960s before their 1969 convictions for murder. Hardy portrays both Kray brothers and Browning plays Frances Shea, a woman who tragically falls for Reggie Kray and marries him. In October 2015, Universal Studios released the film in the U.S. after its premiere at Toronto International Film Festival in September 2015.

Browning recently completed production on Eddie O’Keefe’s directorial debut, Shangri-La Suite. The film, which was also written by O’Keefe and Chris Hutton, follows two young lovers, played by Browning and Luke Grimes, who break out of a mental hospital in 1974 and set out on a road trip to Los Angeles to fulfill the boy’s lifelong dream of killing his idol, Elvis Presley. Shangri-La Suite is being produced by Ron Yerxa and Albert Berger of Bona Fide Productions. 

Browning’s debut acting role was in the 1998 Hallmark Channel movie The Echo of Thunder. Additional roles in her home country of Australia soon followed, including recurring roles in the television series’ “Blue Heelers,” “Something in the Air,” and “High Flyers.” Other film credits include: Ghost Ship, Ned Kelly, The Uninvited, Stranded, Sucker Punch, Magic Magic, The Host, Summer in February, Plush, and Pompeii

Browning currently resides in Los Angeles.

Mad Sweeney

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Presenting Mad Sweeney

A six foot six leprechaun with anger issues. 

Mad Sweeney

Mad Sweeney

Do you know who he is, who he really is?

- Mad Sweeney on Mr. Wednesday

A down-on-his-luck leprechaun who is having a hard time understanding how he lost his charm and his way.

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Always up for a good fight, Sweeney is never deprived while in the employment of Mr. Wednesday.

Mad Sweeney is the leprechaun who is the muscle of Wednesday and so he's spent the last, however many hundred years, following Wednesday around and doing odd jobs for him and intimidating people for him.

- Pablo Schreiber who plays Mad Sweeney.

Pablo Schreiber on Mad Sweeney

A six foot six leprechaun who loves a good fight – Pablo Schreiber discusses his eccentric character, Mad Sweeney.

Mad Sweeney, Laura, and the Lucky Coin

Mad Sweeney, Laura, and the Lucky Coin

Mad Sweeney is on a mission to get his back lucky coin after he mistakenly gives it to Shadow. Pablo Schreiber, who plays the down-on-his-luck leprechaun, explains why the coin is vital to Mad Sweeney's existence, and how - in his quest to get it - he forms an unlikely partnership with Laura Moon. 

What's the importance of Mad Sweeney's gold coin? And how does he lose it?  

Well, the importance of the coin is it's his luck, it's his life force, basically...So when he loses his lucky coin, which is his Sun coin, he loses all of his luck. And that's one of the great kinds of ironies and opens up a lot of comedy opportunities in this series, because obviously a leprechaun who's lost his luck is good fodder for sport. And so, the importance of it is that it's what keeps him going - it's what gives him his magic, it's what gives him his luck and his charm - and when he loses it, he's lost all of that. So it's imperative if he wants to be the demi-god that he has been for the last few hundred years he has to get his coin back. 

Why is Laura important to Mad Sweeney?  

Because she ends up with his lucky coin. Sweeney gives it to Shadow mistakenly [and then] Shadow takes that coin and drops it into the grave of his dead wife, Laura, and it ends up resurrecting her. So she ends up with his lucky coin in her chest and it's what brings her back to life. So that's why he needs to find Laura, in order to get his lucky coin back. But when he goes to her grave, she's not there and she has left the site of the grave and dug herself out. So then he has to track her down. 

And when he tracks her down he finds that...she now has incredible super-human strength and she begins to toss him around like a rag doll to great comedic effect. And that's the crux of their relationship, is that he needs the coin that she's got, but he can't take it from her. It has to be given of her own free will. So until she agrees to give the coin back, he can't take it. And besides the fact that…she's dead and has super-human strengths, she's way stronger than him and he can't take it back even if he wanted to. 

So they're kind of stuck as this odd couple, where she needs him, because he knows where Shadow is and he can take her to Shadow. And he needs her, because he's got her coin. 

Pablo Schreiber on Creating the Beat Up Look

Pablo Schreiber on Creating the Beat Up Look

Sweeney gets banged up in just about every scene. You must spend a lot of time in make-up, can you tell us about that process?  

I spend a lot of time in make-up, but it's only partially because of the fact that I get banged around all the time. I spend a lot of time in make-up, because I, obviously, don't have red hair or a red beard. So the wig takes quite some time and then painting all my beard red takes a fair amount of time as well. And then we have to put on all these cuts. Most of the damage to him takes place in the first three episodes, but then we establish that look. And, because this series takes place over the course of a week or nine days, none of his cuts have time to heal, so he's got those cuts that he has from the first three episodes through the rest of the series. So, yes, there's a fair amount of time in hair and make-up, but it's fun. I really love the uniqueness of the look of this character, so I'm willing to sit and suffer through it a little while.

An Introduction to Remember

Mad Sweeney sure knows how to make an entrance.

Pablo Schreiber

Pablo Schreiber

is Mad Sweeney

Pablo Schreiber was recently nominated for an Emmy® Award for his performance as sadistic Corrections Officer George ‘Pornstache’ Mendez in the smash hit Netflix original series “Orange Is The New Black.” Schreiber was also recently seen starring opposite Tim Robbins and Jack Black in the HBO comedy series “The Brink” directed by Jay Roach, and in a major recurring role on “Law and Order: SVU” as sociopathic serial killer William Lewis who kidnaps and torments Olivia Benson played by Mariska Hargitay.

He was recently seen starring in the Paramount film 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi directed by Michael Bay. Next up, he will be seen in several films including The King’s Daughter opposite Pierce Brosnan and William Hurt; the Cary Fukanagaproduced film Thumper opposite Eliza Taylor and Lena Headey; the lead of the independent drama Traces; and the comedy film Big Bear opposite Adam Brody and Zachary Knighton.

On stage, Schreiber was nominated for a Tony® Award for his Broadway debut performance in the revival of Clifford Odets' classic Awake and Sing! directed by Bartlett Sher.

He has appeared in many films, including: Josh Radnor’s Happythankyoumoreplease, which won the ‘Audience Award’ at Sundance, Vicky Christina Barcelona, The Lords of Dogtown, Tell Tale, Nights in Rodanthe, The Manchurian Candidate, Allegiance, Breaking Upwards, Into the Fire, The Mudge Boy, and Invitation to a Suicide. He appears in Stephen Frears’ upcoming Muhammad Ali's Greatest Fight and the independent features The Dramatics and Fort Bliss.

Other television credits include his classic role as Nick Sobotka in HBO's critically acclaimed “The Wire” “Weeds,” “A Gifted Man,” “Light's Out,” “The Good Wife,” “White Collar,” “The Beast,” “Life on Mars,” “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia,” “Fear Itself,” “Dirt,” “A Painted House,” “Law & Order,” “Law & Order: Criminal Intent,” and “The Black Donnellys.”

Schreiber has performed in numerous Broadway and off-Broadway plays including: Desire Under the Elms on Broadway directed by Robert Falls, Rajiv Joseph's Gruesome Playground Injuries at Second Stage, Neil LaBute's Reasons to be Pretty at MCC (for which he won the ‘Drama Desk Award’), Dying City at Lincoln Center, Mr. Marmalade at Roundabout, Sin: A Cardinal Deposed at The New Group, Manuscript at the Daryl Roth Theatre, Julius Caesar at the New York Shakespeare Festival, and Blood Orange which was his professional debut.

Bilquis

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Presenting Bilquis

Bilquis so far...

About Bilquis

About Bilquis

Will you call me goddess? Will you pray to me? Will you worship me with your body?

- Bilquis

The ancient Sumerian goddess of love, Bilquis craves the worship she inspired in eras long gone, and is eager to find that same relevance in today’s world.

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You worship her with total devotion. And it has to be total.

- Yetide Badaki who plays Bilquis

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One of the most amazing sequences for me when I was reading it was the Goddess Bilquis eating a man with her vagina!... That came up in the Starz meeting, they were like, ‘how are you going to do that moment?’ and we said, ‘we’re going to do it exactly as written’.

- Bryan Fuller speaking to IndieWire

Yetide Badaki on Bilquis

Why does Bilquis need total devotion? And what’s the deal with all the sex? Yetide Badaki explains.

An Interview With Yetide Badaki

An Interview With Yetide Badaki

Did you do any special research to prepare for this role? 

I did a lot. For a while I was worried that people would see my browser and blush. There was a lot of research into, yes, the erotic, but what was interesting is it kept on bringing it back to creation, myths, and to mythology. It was really interesting to see how the idea of love then changed over the centuries, and especially even now the way that love –there are articles now about how we're losing the intimacy; how it's becoming colder, it's becoming emptier... Everything I'm seeing is through Bilquis' lens, and the question always is: how will a love goddess survive in this present-day world?

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Can you describe Bilquis' L.A. apartment and how it reflects your character? 

Yes, Bilquis' L.A. apartment is in all beautiful shades of red. Actually I should say 'raw liver red'. We were joking that Home Depot will probably call that colour 'Bilquis red' now. You have walls covered in it; you have drapes in it, carpets, and it really has this primal feel. You feel that sensual energy as soon as you walk into it. The largest part of it, which I guess is fitting for a love goddess, is there's a humongous bed framed by beautiful candles and its own modern-day alter. 

What does that red mean to Bilquis? 

That red means love, means adoration. [It’s] very sensual...by sensual I'm talking of the actual use of the senses, visceral quality to that space, and to the acts that she performs in that space. 

Yetide Badaki

Yetide Badaki

is Bilquis

The Nigerian born actress grew up in England and the United States, and has spent most of her career working in the theater. 

She recently guest starred on the Showtime series “Masters of Sex” and was on Sony Crackle series “Sequestered” with Jesse Bradford and Summer Glau. Additional credits include guest starring roles on the David Duchovny NBC series “Aquarius,” “US,” “NCIS: New Orleans,” and “Criminal Minds.”

Test Syndicut Button

Show the world you Believe with this official limited edition in partnership with American Gods and Shadow Moon actor Ricky Whittle. Portion of proceeds supports Love Is Louder.

Technical Boy

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Presenting Technical Boy

The god of technology, with a bit of a chip on his shoulder.

About Technical Boy

About Technical Boy

Played by Bruce Langley

We are going to delete you. One click and you are overridden.

- Technical Boy

Technical Boy, a New God, is purveyor of all things technology. Desperate to prove himself, and hungry for respect and power, he struggles to keep his impulsivity and petulance in check, making him dangerously unpredictable.

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"He is one of the most powerful deities at the time that we’re seeing the story in American Gods. With the exponential growth of modern technologies and the internet, and how much everyone is engaging with them...All of that feeds him power. That’s kind of like a drug to him. As far as he’s concerned, he is the Lord of all Creation and nothing can stop him."

- Bruce Langley who plays Technical Boy

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What's the deal with Technical Boy?

Bruce Langley explains how his abrasive character gets his power.

Reprogrammed Reality

"What's the game plan, man?" In episode 1, Technical Boy interrogates Shadow in his limo. 

An Interview With Bruce Langley

An Interview With Bruce Langley

The actor who plays Technical Boy gives us more insight into the mind of this New God.

Who is Technical Boy?

Technical Boy is one of the New Gods. He is the god of all technology, and the god of the Internet. So...any kind of technology, he will get some form of power from that. He’s described very often as a bratty punk. He’s very, very impulsive. He’s a little dangerous. Keep your eye on him, because you never really know exactly what he’s going to do. 

How does he personify the Internet? 

Everything is very, very immediate with him. So think like, dopamine hit, sugar hit...He’s very fast paced. Everything is now; he’s very impatient. He’s always changing. Similarly with the internet, you’ll never see the same iteration of something. 30 seconds after something has gone by, it’s old hat, it’s done, it’s nothing. Everyone wants something new. Similarly, with Tech Boy, every time you see him, he’s got a different look. His whole outfit changes, his hair changes, everything. He immediately updates every single time you see him. 

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Describe Technical Boy’s look.

It varies exponentially. There’s always a kind of air of audacity about it. He’d describe it as current. It’s cutting edge, it’s new, it’s different. He looks kind of punky. Everything about him has kind of got an air of, “Screw you,” about it. 


What makes Technical Boy so overly confident?

He is one of the most powerful deities at the time that we’re seeing the story in American Gods. With the exponential growth of modern technologies and the internet, and how much everyone is engaging with them. I mean, people are already co-dependent on technology. It’s only getting more and more and more as time goes on. All of that feeds him power. That’s kind of like a drug to him. As far as he’s concerned, he is the Lord of all Creation and nothing can stop him. Whether or not that’s true or not, you’ll have to wait and see. He believes he’s absolutely untouchable. 


What drives him? What does he want?

It varies. A lot of the time he needs to feel validated. He is incredibly young. He is really trying to state himself as not just a player, but the player. He’s got so much more power than pretty much any other god at this stage. Everyone instantly just writes him off. No one cares about him. No one gives him the respect he feels he deserves. So, a lot about what he does is trying to validate himself, and be like, “Look, when I’m in the room if there’s only one person you look at, it’s me.” 


What sort of powers does he have? 

So, any integration with any kind of technology. So think cameras, microphones on everything. So, he can see everything you do; he can hear everything you do. Literally any kind of technology you can imagine, he can utilise for his own advantage. He’s also, because he has got a certain degree of status about him, got some buddies that he has downloaded and then made. He refers to them as his children, who are essentially his henchmen, his bodyguards who he has floating around. He never really gets his hands dirty in a kind of brawling fight, because he never really needs to. He can get all the information he needs, and he can manipulate you to do pretty much anything that he wants you to do. 

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If he doesn’t like you, can he delete you from the internet?

Yes, absolutely. So, if Technical Boy doesn’t like you, he can literally delete you to the point where you didn’t really exist. There are no records of you; there are no files of you; people don’t remember you. You never existed. So yes, he’s got the power to erase you from existence, as well as being a little impetuous. 


What makes him vulnerable? What is his weakness?

Technical Boy would say that he has absolutely no weaknesses. He is very impulsive, and you touched on it earlier, he’s over-confident. He can put himself in situations where he hasn’t taken into account all the variables. He thinks faster than people anyway. He’s operating at the rate of artificial super-intelligence, so he can calculate way faster than anyone else. There are certain probabilities that his confidence in himself would just make him go, “No, don’t even consider that.” Then he gets himself in situations where maybe he is not as secure as he thought he was. You’ll have to wait and see what happens when he gets in those, and how he does or doesn’t get himself out of those.

Bruce Langley

Bruce Langley

is Technical Boy

Newcomer Bruce Langley is a young actor with an extensive background in physical, naturalistic, and improvised performance. He graduated with a First Class Masters in Physical Actor Training and Performance in 2014 from the University of Kent.

Langley’s recent credits include: Chase in Faith Drama’s production of The Den, Charlie in The Brockley Jack’s Rock Paper Scissors. “American Gods” is his first television role.

Czernobog

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Presenting Czernobog

"To give a good death is art." Czernobog, god of evil.

About Czernobog

About Czernobog

"To give a good death is art."

- Czernobog

A Slavic god of darkness and evil, His name means ‘Black God’. Living in Chicago with The Zorya Sisters, whom he came to this country with a long time ago.  Forced to use his skills in mundane occupations and is now a cattle slaughterer.  At first he is reluctant to join the coming war, wary of Wednesday’s motivations.

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"I got job on killing floor as a knocker. It was a good job. Yeah, skilled labor. A cow comes up the ramp. Boom, boom, boom. You take a sledge hammer, and--Boop! You knock the cow dead. It takes strength...but not only strength. It takes talent, because it's a craft. You have to do it right, or the cow gets angry. And angry meat taste bad. Yeah, you need arms to break the skull, but that's not the goal. The goal is to crush the brain inside the skull, and quick, before the pain can travel from outside the brain to the inside, so the brain never knows the brain is crushing."

- Czernobog talking to Shadow at dinner.

What’s the deal with Czernobog?

Why is Czernobog’s love of death so strong? And why would he be tempted into war alongside Mr. Wednesday?

Peter Stormare

Peter Stormare

is Czernobog

Swedish born actor/director Peter Stormare is best known for his breakout roles in Fargo and The Big Lebowski

Stormare has worked in over 150 films and most recently in John Wick: Chapter Two with Keanu Reeves and the upcoming Dimension Films release Clown, along with 22 Jump Street, and Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters

He made his television debut starring on the first season of the hit Fox TV drama series “Prison Break” and has also had memorable guest appearances on “Entourage,” “Weeds,” “Hawaii Five-0” and “CSI.” Additional TV and Film credits include Armageddon, 8MM, The Brothers Grimm, Minority Report, Constantine, Bad Boys II, Lockout, Inseparable, The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus, Premonition, “Arrow,” “Manhattan,” “Graceland” and “The Blacklist.”

Mr. World

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Presenting Mr. World

Who runs the world? This guy, apparently.

About Mr. World

About Mr. World

Thats why they call me Mr. World

- Mr. World

Mr. World is the seemingly omniscient leader at the center of the New Gods coalition, sometimes more challenged by his own subordinates than his enemies. 

In keeping an eye on the activities of the Old Gods, he realizes that their ringleader, Mr. Wednesday, poses an imminent threat. 

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Shadow Moon. You have a blood type and a recurring nightmare. B-positive and an orchard of bones. You prefer Swiss to cheddar and can't abide the tines of two forks touching. And this is the face you make when you masturbate. The same as your mother, who had 86 sexual partners throughout her life. Everything that happens is recorded and stored and recalled - The Book of Life

- Mr. World to Shadow Moon

Michael Green on Mr. World

Who is this immaculately dressed man of mystery? Michael Green explains.

Crispin Glover

Crispin Glover

is Mr. World

Crispin Hellion Glover is a multifaceted American artist. He is primarily known as a film actor, but is also a publisher, filmmaker, and author. His career has been marked by some portrayals of wonderfully eccentric people, such as George McFly in Back to the Future and Willard Stiles in Willard. In the late 1980s, Glover started his own publishing company Volcanic Eruptions, which turned in to a production company in the 1990s for his film works.

Born in New York City, Glover moved to Los Angeles at the age of three and a half. As a child, he attended Mirman School for Highly Gifted Children. His father, Bruce Glover, is an actor best remembered for playing the offbeat Spectre assassin Mr. Wint in the James Bond movie Diamonds Are Forever and one of Jack Nicholson's assistants, Duffy, in Chinatown. Crispin Glover’s first professional acting appearance was in 1978 in Los Angeles at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in The Sound of Music. He played Friedrich Von Trapp to Florence Henderson’s Maria. He also appeared in some commercials and several sitcoms as a teenager. His first film role was in 1983’s My Tutor, following with a small role in Racing with the Moon opposite Sean Penn. He also played the title role in an AFI film The Orkly Kid, in which he portrayed a young man whose obsession with Olivia Newton-John raises the ire of his small-town neighbors. Later that year he appeared in Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter (1984) and Teachers.

His breakout performance came in Robert Zemeckis’ Back to the Future, an international box office smash. Glover next starred in River’s Edge. From that point, Glover pursued a defiantly individualistic path. His characters were notable for their peculiar personality traits and unconventional thought processes. He played Andy Warhol in Oliver Stone's The Doors in 1991 and continued to play exceedingly eccentric types, e.g. the title characters in Bartleby (2001) and Willard (2003). He played the Thin Man in the Charlie's Angels, was seen in Hot Tub Time Machine, Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland, and has various upcoming feature film appearances. 

Glover has been touring since 2005 with his two feature films What Is It? and its sequel It Is Fine! Everything Is Fine. He is using an unusual self-distribution model for his films that includes performing live shows titled Crispin Hellion Glover’s Big Slide Show Parts 1 & 2. These shows are each a one-hour dramatic narration of eight different profusely illustrated books. The images from these books are projected behind him. He continues to tour the world with these two films. They have each won awards at the Ann Arbor Film Festival and the Sitges International Film Festival. Crispin is editing his next feature film which is currently untitled and features himself and his father acting together for the first time.

Easter

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Presenting Easter

Easter, what we know so far...

About Easter

About Easter

Easter, once known as Ostara, goddess of spring, Easter now embraces the jelly beans and chocolate bunnies associated with the holiday that bears her name, in an effort to stay relevant.

Michael Green on Easter

Michael Green, American Gods showrunner, explains the story behind Easter.

Believing is Seeing

Just a regular lunch with Jesus and Easter.

Kristin Chenoweth

Kristin Chenoweth

is Easter

Emmy® and Tony® Award-winning actress and singer Kristin Chenoweth’s career spans film, television, voiceover, and stage. In 2015, Chenoweth received a coveted star on The Hollywood Walk of Fame. In 2009, she received an Emmy® Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series for her role in “Pushing Daises.” In 1999, she won a Tony Award for You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown and she was also nominated for her original role of Glinda the Good Witch in Wicked in 2004. Chenoweth has been nominated for two Emmy® Awards and for a People’s Choice Award for her role on “Glee.” In 2009, she wrote an uplifting candid, comedic chronicle of her life so far, A Little Bit Wicked, which debuted on the New York Times Hardcover Non Fiction Best Seller List. 

In 2015, Chenoweth earned a Drama Desk Award, Outer Critics Circle Award, and Broadway.com Audience Choice Award for her lead role in the Roundabout Theatre Company’s On the Twentieth Century. She also earned nominations for a Tony Award and a Drama League Award. Chenoweth has performed to sold-out audiences across the world, including performances at Carnegie Hall and Royal Albert Hall. In 2014, she released a CD and DVD of her own live concert performance, Kristin Chenoweth: Coming Home. Notable television roles include appearances in “The West Wing,” Disney’s “Descendants” and most recently “The Muppets” and NBC’s “Hairspray Live!” as Velma Von Tussle. In film, Chenoweth voiced the role of Gabi in the hit animated film Rio 2, and Fifi, Snoopy’s beloved French poodle in The Peanuts Movie. This spring, she starred in the indie teen drama entitled Hard Sell and began pre-production on Lionsgate/Hasbro’s My Little Pony movie, set for a fall 2017 release. 

On September 23, Chenoweth released The Art of Elegance, her first album of American Songbook classics via Concord Records. In November, she will return to the stage in My Love Letter to Broadway, a limited engagement at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre.

Chenoweth’s dream of designing her own collection came to fruition, and much success when her exclusive modern fashion jewelry collection for HSN became available for purchase on www.hsn.com. Each piece of the collection tells a unique story that is representative of her life story and passions. 

Mr. Nancy

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Mr. Nancy

Mr. Nancy

Mr. Nancy, the old African trickster god more commonly known as Anansi, and one of Mr. Wednesday’s oldest confidantes. Like Wednesday, Nancy is ready to bring this new America (and its new gods) to its knees, desperate to light a fire and watch the whole world burn. 

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Once upon a time, a man got fucked. Now, how is that for a story? 'Cause that's the story of black people in America.

- Mr. Nancy preaching to slaves on a slave ship.

Presenting Mr. Nancy

Who is this mysterious spider god?

Mr. Nancy is Angry

The spider-god does not mince his words about what these slaves have in store.

Orlando Jones

Orlando Jones

is Mr. Nancy

In a career spanning 30 years, Orlando Jones' versatility is well documented. He began his career by launching an advertising agency in his teens and then working behind the scenes as a writer on “A Different World” and “Martin.” He wrote and produced “Roc Live”, the first prime time scripted American series since the late 1950s to broadcast each episode of an entire season live. He then worked as part of the creative team that launched the FX Network into 18 million homes as a writer and on-camera personality. Jones later combined his writing and acting talents when he was handpicked by Quincy Jones to join sketch comedy franchise, “MadTV.” Following his tenure on the show he partnered with 7Up to write, produce and star in a series of iconic television commercials that are still recognized among the Top 100 most successful advertising campaigns of all time.


Heralded as a creative innovator across multiple media platforms, Jones was recognized as WhoSay’s Social Media Celebrity of 2014 and MTV’s “King of Fandom” in 2015. His passionate advocacy for the changing relationship between fans and creators has afforded him the opportunity to speak at various fan studies, conferences, and contribute to numerous academic publications.

In 2015, Jones co-founded the immersive content studio Legion of Creatives with former Disney executive Jay Williams and writer/producer Noam Dromi. The company is producing a wide range of multi-platform programs including the original series “High School 51”, created by Star Trek, Transformers, and Amazing Spiderman 2 writer/producer Roberto Orci.


In 2016, Jones was chosen by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to host The Oscars Backstage for the 88th Academy Awards, an interactive second screen experience tied to the official broadcast of the event.

Later this year, he'll be seen in the independent feature film The Devil and The Deep Blue Sea as well as the film Tainted Love, based on the graphic novel-style action comedy, which he also wrote and produced. It's a first of its kind digital feature that is the launching pad for a unique narrative journey across multiple platforms.

Episode One
The Bone Orchard

When Shadow Moon is released from prison a few days early, following the death of his wife, he meets the enigmatic Mr. Wednesday and is conscripted into his employ as bodyguard.  Attacked on his first day on the job, Shadow quickly discovers that this role may be more than he bargained for.

The Arrow Scene

That's one way to cut short a celebration.

What is 'Coming to America'?

The first scene of the series is an epic journey of Vikings traversing the seas. This is just one of the ‘Coming to America’ sequences appearing throughout the series. The book’s author, Neil Gaiman, explains the concept behind them, and brings the Vikings’ expedition to life with his own words.

360 Crocodile Bar

An interactive 360 walk through of The Crocodile Bar set. Click the circle to begin.

Ricky Whittle (Shadow Moon), Ian McShane (Mr. Wednesday), Pablo Schreiber (Mad Sweeney) and Bryan Fuller (American Gods showrunner) talk us through shooting in the dive bar where Mad Sweeney and Shadow first meet. 

Some of the Best Bits

Some of the Best Bits

The Showrunners on Making The Bone Orchard

Warning: Spoiler Alert. 

Bryan Fuller and Michael Green take us into the world of making The Bone Orchard. Talking us through Shadow's premonitions,  that scene with Bilquis, and the anatomy of the Viking scene. 

Still to Come...

What's in store for the rest of the series.

On the Next Episode

Here's what's coming up in episode 2 - The Secret of Spoons.

Neil Gaiman on Norse Gods

On his trip to Iceland, Neil Gaiman tells us of the significance of the old gods and Vikings in the unique and beautiful country that inspired his novel.

Episode Two
The Secret Of Spoons

As Mr. Wednesday begins recruitment for the coming battle, Shadow Moon travels with him to Chicago, and agrees to a very high stakes game of checkers with the old Slavic god, Czernobog. 

Inside The World: The Secret of Spoons

Warning: Spoiler. 

Bryan Fuller and Michael Green take us into the world of making 'The Secret of Spoons' telling us what the name is all about and what their hopes were for the slave ship scene with Mr. Nancy. 

Some of the Best Bits

Some of the Best Bits

On the Next Episode

Here's what's in store for episode 3 - Head Full of Snow.

Who Are the Modern Gods?

Neil Gaiman explains the concept of the modern gods - and why they are dangerous not just in the series but in real life too.

Episode Three
Head Full Of Snow

Shadow questions the terms of his employment when Mr. Wednesday informs him of his plan to rob a bank (because, naturally, every army needs a source of funding). And just when Shadow thought his life couldn’t get any more complicated, he returns to his motel room to a surprising discovery. 

Some of the Best Bits

Some of the Best Bits

Inside the World: Head Full of Snow

Warning: Spoilers.

The showrunners talk about creating an episode where we see Shadow's first experience with God-like powers, a powerful gay storyline, and one woman's acceptance of death versus another woman's rejection of it.

Writing Gods in the Modern Context

One of the most challenging aspects of writing American Gods was creating gods, both old and new, for today’s world. Here Neil Gaiman explains why this was an exercise in tight rope walking.

In the Next Episode

Coming up in episode 4 - Git Gone.

Episode Four
Git Gone

Alternating between the past and the present, Laura’s life and death are explored - how she met Shadow, how she died, and how exactly she came to be sitting on the edge of his motel room bed. 

Vulgar Woman

When Laura turns up at Audrey's house, it all gets a bit vulgar.

Inside The World: Git Gone

How did they film Laura with one arm? Why's it called 'Git Gone'? And why did they go so 'off-book'? Michael and Bryan explain all...

Some of the Best Bits

Some of the Best Bits

Behind the Scenes with Ricky Whittle and Emily Browning

The on screen husband and wife talk their relationship and the complexities of Laura’s personality.

On the Next Episode

Coming up in episode 5 - Lemon Scented You.

Episode Five
Lemon Scented You

Trying to work things out with his dead and unfaithful wife, Shadow’s emotional reunion is interrupted when he and Mr. Wednesday are kidnapped by the New Gods. 

Not Quite What He Was Expecting

They both seem quite attached to that coin.

Inside The World: Lemon Scented You

Michael and Bryan on the making of 'Lemon Scented You'. We hear them talk about their first meeting with Crispin Glover and how this set the tone for Mr. World. And why creating the Mad Sweeney and Laura partnership was so exciting.

some of the best bits

some of the best bits

Road Trip Buddies

Which character would Neil choose to go on a road trip with?

Who is Neil Gaiman's Favourite Character?

With so many powerful, eccentric, and complex characters, who is Neil’s favourite?

On the Next Episode

Coming up in episode 6 - A Murder of Gods. 

Episode Six
A Murder Of Gods

On the run after the New Gods’ show of force, Shadow and Mr. Wednesday seek safe haven with one of Mr. Wednesday’s oldest friends, Vulcan, God of the Fire and the Forge. 

Inside The World: A Murder of Gods

"How do you put a volcano in the hands of your worshipers? Well you give them a gun." Michael Green and Bryan Fuller talk us through the making of episode 6. 

Some of the Best Bits

Some of the Best Bits

On The Next Episode

Here's what's coming up in episode 7: A Prayer for Mad Sweeney

Episode Seven
A Prayer For Mad Sweeney

Her brief reunion with Shadow over far too quickly, Laura turns to an unlikely travel companion to find her way back to life, and back to Shadow. Mad Sweeney’s long, winding, and often tragic past is explored.

Inside the World

The showrunners tell us why they chose Emily Browning to play Essie McGowan, and the crucial role of the wardrobe department for this episode.

Some of the Best Bits

Some of the Best Bits

On The Next Episode

The series finale is upon us. Here's what's in store...

Episode Eight
Come to Jesus

On the eve of war, Mr. Wednesday must recruit one more Old God: Ostara, né Easter, Goddess of the Dawn. But winning her over will require making a good impression, and that is where Mr. Nancy comes in. 

Some of the Best Bits

Some of the Best Bits

Inside The World

Bryan Fuller and Michael Green talk us through how they decided to depict Jesus, and why casting devout Christian Kristin Chenoweth as Easter was "too delicious to ignore."

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About

Scroll right for everything you ever wanted to know about American Gods...

First Look

Based on the international best-selling novel by Neil Gaiman, American Gods follows Shadow Moon as he embarks on a road trip across America with enigmatic conman Mr. Wednesday. 

Brought to the screen by executive producers Bryan Fuller, Michael Green and Neil Gaiman.

About The Series

About The Series

When Shadow Moon is released from prison, he meets the mysterious Mr. Wednesday and a storm begins to brew. Little does Shadow know, this storm will change the course of his entire life. 

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Left adrift by the recent, tragic death of his wife, and suddenly hired as Mr. Wednesday’s bodyguard, Shadow finds himself in the center of a world that he struggles to understand.

About2_Content_Image1

As Shadow travels across the country with Mr. Wednesday, he struggles to accept this new reality, and his place in it.

American Gods Origins

Take a trip back to Iceland with Neil Gaiman, as he reveals the origins of his epic story.

What People Are Saying

What People Are Saying

Reviews of the Series

“It's never less than compelling, offering an innovative, fantastical skew on the American immigrant narrative, and a visual feast throughout. If Fuller and Green maintain the sky-high quality of these first two episodes, this will be something very special.”

Empire

“It is a wholly unique drama with a clear sense of identity. It’s a fantastic entry in the list of shows that give no care to the whims of pretentious awards culture…It is what it wants to be. It is a show to be reckoned with.” 

Forbes

“Fuller uses American Gods to create an ironic hero’s journey epic, a big saga fantasy a la Game of Thrones or The Walking Dead that casts shade on the genre and transforms our country’s checkered history and high-low culture into a richly subversive mythology.

…I was consistently engrossed. The characters, the concept, the deeply considered filmmaking captured my imagination…I’m fascinated to see where Shadow’s anti-hero odyssey leads, which side of this American Ragnarok he chooses, or if he rejects the gods and bidding to bind his mind, heart and soul once and for all.”

Entertainment Weekly

“A dramatic, cinematic exploration of mythology and migration, pushing the bar of "prestige television" up yet another impressive notch.”

The Telegraph

Do-not-miss television lived large on the big-picture topics and themes of our time as old-world deities and new-world manifestations spar and war across the American cultural tundra… 

American Gods may also be the best thing Fuller or Green have ever done – and those guys were behind NBC’s Hannibal and the R-rated blockbuster Logan, respectively.

One of the best new shows of 2017 in my book, the series directed by David Slade, Floria Sigismondi and Craig Zobel is…a genre-busting and glorious buddy road show with McShane’s Mr. Wednesday and Whittle’s just-out-of-prison Shadow Moon heading down the interstate of the impossible and hidden. However, also at its deep ensemble-coiled heart of myths and the men and women who believe they master them, this American Gods has a love story, expanded characters, cops, robbers, dead celebs and legitimately deep thoughts baked in to bring to life the core American conversations of race, faith, immigration and civil rights.

…Whatever else you may be worshiping on the small screen…you need to convert to American Gods.”


Deadline

Neil Gaiman Introduces us to the Series

The author of the international best-selling American Gods novel introduces us to the concept of belief, the old and new gods, and gives us an insight into the bizarre world that Shadow finds himself embroiled in.

What's Different From The Book?

What's Different From The Book?

American Gods is a delight for fans of the book and newcomers alike.

- Variety

So, you’ve read the book, but what can you expect from the TV series? Find out below.

1. The Timeline

With the novel full to the brim of fast-paced action and big ideas, the series takes a slower pace, lingering longer on stories and characters. The series covers the first third of the book up until the House on the Rock. 

I didn’t get to kind of finish the book until we wrapped… but that’s when I really realised what Bryan [Fuller] and Michael [Green] had done with the storyline. The whole kind of timeline had changed around, so even hardcore American Gods fans won’t know what’s going on in this show. It’s going to be fresh for their eyes… So, everything you loved that’s in the book is going to be in the show, but then so much more. source

- Ricky Whittle who plays Shadow Moon.

This means two things – the series finale will be completely different to the book. And - there’s plenty of room for a sequel, something Neil Gaiman always kept in mind when Exec Producing. He’d share plot secrets with showrunners Michael Green and Bryan Fuller, 

There were moments, which they were very good about listening to, when I would say, ‘Okay, nobody but you two knows anything at all about the plot of American Gods 2, but I need to tell you that this line, which seems like a bit of dialogue that you could lose, will become important. Or this little scene — an indigenous scene — which seems trivial will become important one day and if we get to season 5, we’ll need it then, so let’s put it here now.' source

- Neil Gaiman.

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2. Expanded roles

The book is largely told from Shadow’s perspective, and it’s not often that we know what happens when Shadow’s not physically there. The series, however, is not told in the same way, which allows other characters to have their roles expanded massively.

This is most noticeable amongst the book’s female characters. Laura Moon has the whole of episode four dedicated to her and her backstory, and we also see a lot more of Bilquis, Audrey, and Gillian Anderson’s Media.

Mad Sweeney also has an expanded role – so prepare for more profanity-filled rants and cutting one-liners as he goes on a road trip with an unlikely partner in crime – Laura Moon.

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3. Mad Sweeney and Tech Boy have a make-over

Mad Sweeney has been brought up to date with more of a hipster-trash than trucker-trash look.  Pablo Schreiber who plays Mad Sweeney, says his take on the character would be at home in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, the hipster capital of the world. Tech Boy is no longer the nerdy, overweight boy from the novel. He now owns quaffed hair, a vape and hella swagger. 

Why Watch?

Maybe you’re the book’s biggest fan, or maybe you’ve never heard of it. But why should you watch the series? American Gods author, Neil Gaiman, tells us what he hopes we’ll get from it, including what questions it might make us ask ourselves.

About the book

About the book

American Gods is a Hugo and Nebula Award-winning novel by English author Neil Gaiman. It's sold countless millions of copies and has been translated into 30 languages. 

The novel is a blend of Americana, fantasy, and various strands of ancient and modern mythology, all centering on the mysterious and taciturn Shadow. 


'Original, engrossing, and endlessly inventive' - George R. R. Martin.

If you are to survive, you must believe.

Shadow Moon has served his time. But hours before his release from prison, his beloved wife is killed in a freak accident. Dazed, he boards a plane home where he meets the enigmatic Mr Wednesday, who professes both to know Shadow and to be king of America. Together they embark on a profoundly strange road trip across the USA, encountering a kaleidoscopic cast of characters along the way. Yet all around them a storm threatens to break. The war has already begun, an epic struggle for the very soul of America, and Shadow is standing squarely in its path.

Prizes

American Gods won the Hugo, Nebula, Bram Stoker, SFX and Locus awards.

Reviews

'A fantastic novel... runs as precisely as clockwork, but reads as smoothly as silk or warm chocolate' - The Times on AMERICAN GODS

'Gaiman has a rich imagination...and an ability to tackle large themes' (Philip Pullman)

Author Biography

Neil Gaiman is the author of over thirty acclaimed books and graphic novels for adults and children, including AMERICAN GODS, STARDUST, CORALINE and THE GRAVEYARD BOOK. His most recent novel for adults, THE OCEAN AT THE END OF THE LANE was highly acclaimed, appeared on the hardback and paperback Sunday Times bestseller lists and won several awards, including being voted Book of the Year in the National Book Awards 2013: 'Some books you read. Some books you enjoy. But some books just swallow you up, heart and soul' Joanne Harris.


The recipient of numerous literary honours, Neil Gaiman's work has been adapted for film, television and radio. He has written scripts for Doctor Who, collaborated with authors and illustrators including Terry Pratchett, Dave McKean and Chris Riddell, and THE SANDMAN is established as one of the classic graphic novels. As George R R Martin says: 'There's no one quite like Neil Gaiman.'


Originally from England, Neil Gaiman now lives in America.


You can buy the American Gods book here (UK) and here (US) and follow Neil Gaiman on Twitter @neilhimself

Travelling America

“Most of the things in the book that I describe, I saw.” Here’s how the back roads of America helped shape the book.

American Gods From the Mouths of the Cast

American Gods From the Mouths of the Cast

“American Gods is an epic journey of love, revenge, redemption and war.” 

-- Ricky Whittle who plays Shadow Moon. 

'American Gods' is futuristic, but set in the present day… One of the reasons why I wanted to do this show when they asked me, is because it’s a completely different kind of show. It appears normal, but it’s not…abnormal things happen the entire time.” 

-- Ian McShane who plays Mr. Wednesday. 

“What isn’t it about? It’s lots of things. It’s the way I see it; it’s a look at what it really means, to make us humans, centred through the lens of what it is we believe in. So, what is American Gods, what do we believe in and how does that shape who we are? In a nutshell.” 

-- Bruce Langley who plays Technical Boy 

“I think one of the great things about this show is that Neil Gaiman is on board, and so all the casting, all these ideas are being held true to. You’re seeing one of the most varied casts I ever worked in and it keeps getting bigger, and it keeps getting more diverse.” 

-- Yetide Badaki who plays Bilquis. 

“My favourite thing about the show is that this is a show that asks us to look really strongly at what we give our time to and I think that's the thing that, for me, has the most value. It’s asking us, as Americans, to look at what we're putting our time into. And, wherever that leads you I think it's a positive thing to reflect on.” 

-- Pablo Schreiber who plays Mad Sweeney.  

Who Are the Modern Gods?

Neil Gaiman explains the concept of the modern gods - and why they are dangerous not just in the series but in real life too.

A Country of Immigrants

“It’s an immigrant novel because I was an immigrant.” Immigration is a strong underlying theme throughout the series. Who are we going to meet, and what are their stories?

Cast Credits

Cast Credits

Starring

Ricky Whittle Shadow Moon

Ian McShane Mr. Wednesday

Emily Browning Laura Moon 

Pablo Schreiber Mad Sweeney

Crispin Glover Mr. World 

Yetide Badaki Bilquis 

Bruce Langley Technical Boy 


Additional Cast

Gillian Anderson Media

Kristin Chenoweth Easter

Peter Stormare Czernobog

Cloris Leachman Zorya Vechernyaya

Orlando Jones Mr. Nancy

Jonathan Tucker Low Key Lyesmith

Corbin Bernsen Vulcan

Demore Barnes Mr. Ibis

Omid Atahi Salim

Mousa Kraish The Jinn

Chris Obi Anubis

Betty Gilpin Audrey

Dane Cook Robbie

Jeremy Davies Jesus

Martha Kelly Zorya Utrennyaya

Erika Kaar Zorya Polunochnaya

About The Team

About The Team

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Bryan Fuller

(Creator/Executive Producer/Writer 101, 102, 103, 106, 108)

Bryan Fuller serves as Executive Producer and Co-Showrunner on Starz’s “American Gods,” based on Neil Gaiman’s award winning novel. 

Fuller got his start writing “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine,” followed by “Star Trek: Voyager,” where he worked his way up from freelance writer to staff writer to co-producer. He charted a new path during his last year on “Star Trek: Voyager,” writing a spec pilot called “Dead Girl,” which became Showtime's “Dead Like Me.”

Fuller then went on to create the critically acclaimed series “Wonderfalls” for FOX and wrote and executive produced the animated short “The Amazing Screw-On Head” with Mike Mignola for the Syfy Channel. He also served as writer and Co-Executive Producer on the first season of NBC's “Heroes” before leaving to create the Emmy® Award-winning “Pushing Daisies” for ABC. He wrote and Executive produced “Mockingbird Lane,” a reimagining of the classic sitcom “The Munsters” as a modern family dramedy, which aired on NBC as a Halloween special, and served as Executive Producer on the television film “High Moon” for Syfy. Bryan then developed and Executive produced the critically-acclaimed series “Hannibal,” which ran for three seasons on NBC. He is an Executive Producer on the next “Star Trek” iteration for CBS All Access.

Fuller was the recipient of the Dan Curtis Legacy Award at the 40th Annual Saturn Awards, as well as the 3rd Annual Award for Comic-Con All Access Game Changer from Spike TV.

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Michael Green 

(Creator/Executive Producer/Writer 101, 102, 103, 104, 106, 108)

Michael Green serves as Executive Producer and Co-Showrunner on Starz’s “American Gods,” adapted from Neil Gaiman’s award-winning novel by himself and Bryan Fuller.

Green’s television work includes creating and executive producing NBC’s “Kings” and ABC’s “The River”. Green’s additional writing and producing credits include “Heroes,” “Everwood,” “Smallville,” “Jack & Bobby,” and “Sex and the City.” 

Green’s feature work includes the upcoming film Logan, sequel to Blade Runner, directed by Denis Villeneuve; Alien: Covenant, directed by Ridley Scott; the final installment of The Wolverine, series, directed by James Mangold; and an adaptation of Agatha Christie’s Murder On The Orient Express, to be directed by Kenneth Branagh. Previous feature work includes co-writing the Warner Bros./DC Comics adaptation of The Green Lantern.

A contributor to DC Comics, Green is the author of several graphic novels including Batman: Lovers and Madmen, Superman/Batman: The Search for Kryptonite, Superman/Batman: Finest Worlds, Supergirl: Last Daughter of Krypton, and Supergirl: Girl in the World.

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Neil Gaiman

(Novel Author, Executive Producer)

Neil Gaiman is the New York Times bestselling author of books, short stories, films, and graphic novels for readers of all ages. He is listed as one of the Top Ten Living Post-Modern Writers by the Dictionary of Literary Biography. His books have been translated into thirty languages and have sold close to seven million copies overseas.

Some of his most notable titles include the novels American Gods (for which he received the Hugo, Nebula, Bram Stoker and Locus awards, and sold half a million copies in the UK alone), The Graveyard Book (the first book to ever win both the Newbery and Carnegie medals), and The Ocean at the End of the Lane, which was named the UK's National Book Award 2013 Book of the Year. American Gods is currently being adapted for television in the US and is expected to debut in 2017 on the Starz network.

Gaiman is also the creator of the hugely popular Sandman comics series, which was the first comic book to ever receive literary recognition when it won the World Fantasy Award for Best Short Story. The latest installment of the series, Sandman Overture, was named Amazon Best Graphic novel of 2015.

Also recently published were his New York Times bestselling non-fiction collection, THE VIEW FROM THE CHEAP SEATS and #1 bestselling, enchantingly reimagined fairy tale, The Sleeper and the Spindle (with illustrations by UK Children's Laureate, Chris Riddell).

Born in the UK, he now lives in the US.

The Author's View

The Author's View

Neil Gaiman, the author of American Gods, gives us insight into the process of writing the book and developing the series.

Who's Neil's Favourite Character?

With so many powerful, eccentric, and complex characters, who is Neil’s favourite?

Road Trip Buddies

Which character would Neil choose to go on a road trip with?

Writing Gods in the Modern Context

One of the most challenging aspects of writing American Gods was creating gods, both old and new, for today’s world. Here Neil Gaiman explains why this was an exercise in tight rope walking.

Shop

Shop

Fancy yourself some American Gods swag? Check out these brands who are bringing you everything you could possibly want – from t-shirts to phone cases – even coasters for your mead. 

Click the links below to bag yourself some merch fit for a god. 

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T-Shirts, sweatshirts and Hoodies from Absolute Cult.


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Buy official limited edition character t-shirts and raise money for the cast's chosen charities at the same time with Represent. 


Forbidden planet img

Comics, coasters, travel passes and more at Forbidden Planet.


Pyramid Posters img

Posters, wall art, mugs and more at Pyramid Posters.


Soundtrack

Soundtrack

Been loving the soundtrack so far? Wondering where you can get your hands on those tunes? Wonder no more. 

Milan Records in conjunction with FremantleMedia North America have released singles and an album of the covers and original songs from American Gods. Composed by Brian Reitzell with original songs performed by Shirley Manson, Debbie Harry and exciting new versions of classics such as “I Put A Spell On You" by Mark Lanegan. 

They're available on all of the platforms below, and you can even pre-save the soundtrack on Spotify. 

Apple Music 
iTunes 
Amazon 
Deezer 
Google Play 
Groove Music 
Napster 
7 Digital 
Acoustic Sounds 
Beatport 
Guvera 
HD Tracks 
Samsung MILK 
SongPop 
Slacker 
Tidal

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Behind the scenes

American Gods was filmed across locations in the US and Canada during 2016. Keep checking back here for exclusive videos and interviews with the cast as well as showrunners Bryan Fuller and Michael Green, and author of the American Gods novel, Neil Gaiman. 

Making American Gods

Making American Gods

From the award-winning novel of the same title, American Gods follows the story of a war brewing between Old and New Gods: the traditional Gods of mythological roots from around the world, steadily losing believers to an upstart pantheon of Gods reflecting society’s modern love of money, technology, media, celebrity and drugs. Its protagonist, Shadow Moon, is an ex-con who becomes bodyguard and travelling partner to Mr. Wednesday, a conman but in reality one of the older Gods, on a cross-country mission to gather his forces in preparation to battle the new deities.

In 2011, American Gods author Neil Gaiman stated at the Edinburgh International Book Festival that HBO had expressed an interest in adapting the novel into a television series. 

In February 2014, Fremantle Media acquired the rights to adapt the novel as a fantasy drama series. In July 2014, it was announced that Starz would be developing the series with Bryan Fuller and Michael Green.

Fuller stated that the series would be "[following] the events of the books but expanding those events, and expanding the point of view to go above and beyond Shadow and Wednesday". 

The cast of American Gods includes Ricky Whittle (Shadow Moon), Ian McShane (Mr. Wednesday), Emily Browning (Laura Moon), Pablo Schreiber (Mad Sweeney), Yetide Badaki (Bilquis), Bruce Langley (Technical Boy), Crispin Glover (Mr. World), Jonathan Tucker (Low Key Lyesmith), Gillian Anderson (Media), Peter Stormare (Czernobog), Cloris Leachman (Zorya Vechernyaya), Omid Abtahi (Salim), Orlando Jones (Mr. Nancy) and Demore Barnes (Mr. Ibis).

American Gods is produced by FremantleMedia North America. Bryan Fuller and Michael Green are writers and showrunners. David Slade is directing the pilot and additional episodes. FMNA’s Craig Cegielski and Stefanie Berk are executive producing the series along with Fuller, Green, Slade and Neil Gaiman.

360 Crocodile Bar

An interactive 360 walk through of The Crocodile Bar set. Click the circle to begin.

Ricky Whittle (Shadow Moon), Ian McShane (Mr. Wednesday), Pablo Schreiber (Mad Sweeney) and Bryan Fuller (American Gods showrunner) talk us through shooting in the dive bar where Mad Sweeney and Shadow first meet. 

Interviews With The Cast and Crew

Interviews With The Cast and Crew

A Storm is Brewing

The cast and crew give us the lowdown on the series.

Out with the Old

The American Gods cast and crew explain what the war between the old and new gods is all about.

Abandoned in America

"God bless the believers." Immigration, belief, worship, attention - how do these themes interweave in American Gods?

Behind the Scenes with Ricky Whittle and Ian Mcshane

Ricky Whittle and Ian McShane talk about creating the unique dynamic between their characters Shadow Moon and Mr. Wednesday.

Behind the Scenes with Ricky Whittle and Emily Browning

The on screen husband and wife talk their relationship and the complexities of Laura’s personality.

Behind the Scenes with Ian Mcshane

What were the most challenging aspects of filming for Ian McShane who plays Mr. Wednesday?

Ricky Whittle on Shadow Moon

Ricky Whittle talks about his character, Shadow Moon, and what we can expect to see of him over the series.

Emily Browning on Laura Moon

Emily Browning discusses her complex character, Laura Moon, who has been developed significantly from the book. 

Pablo Schreiber on Mad Sweeney

A six foot six leprechaun who loves a good fight – Pablo Schreiber discusses his eccentric character, Mad Sweeney.

What's the Deal with Technical Boy?

Bruce Langley explains how his abrasive character gets his power.

Yetide Badaki on Bilquis

Why does Bilquis need total devotion? And what’s the deal with all the sex? Yetide Badaki explains.

Emily Browning on Laura's Death

Emily Browning on Laura's Death

Episode four takes us on Laura Moon’s equally amazing and bizarre journey to her not-quite-dead self. Below, Emily Browning, talks us through the scene between her character, Laura, and Anubis - the Ancient Egyptian god of the dead and mummification.


Tell us about the scene between Anubis and Laura immediately after her death

Anubis goes for Laura’s heart. In typical Laura fashion, she kind of bats him away and is like, “No, that’s not happening.” She essentially says, “You want to weigh my heart against that feather. I can already tell you who wins,” because she’s not the kind of person who feels guilt for anything that she’s done, even though she’s done some really shitty things. She’s kind of a jerk, but she lived her life. She essentially says to Anubis, “There’s no need to weigh my heart, because I already know that it’s heavy because I lived. I did terrible things and I did good things, and I don’t want to be judged by anybody but myself.” I think that’s what sets off the chain of events that makes her this kind of anomaly... They call her an abomination, essentially because she just refuses to have judgement put down upon her.

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Would you say that this is the moment she finds her strength?

Yes.

So, who is Laura now?

Yes, I think she definitely finds her strength in that moment when she essentially chooses not to die, chooses not to be judged and punished accordingly. It’s not that she isn’t strong when she’s alive, I definitely don’t see her as a fragile character, but she just doesn’t have the energy to be strong.  She just doesn’t care, there’s nothing really in life that she’s fighting for. I think suddenly, when she’s faced with that – “You’re going to be judged and then you’re going to be sent to nothingness” – oddly, it’s kind of a wake-up call for her. She finds that strength and decides, “No, I’m not, I’m not. That’s not going to happen.”

She emerges from her grave and she sees this light in the distance. I don’t think she fully understands what it is, but she knows that she has to go towards it. She now has this new purpose of finding that light, and she finds it, and it’s Shadow. I think it’s sort of ironic for Laura because she definitely would never have been one of those girls who was all about true love and, “I want to get married and I want to have a family.” She’s so not a romantic. I think there is a little bit of irony there in the fact that she’s like, “I guess this is my purpose now. I guess it’s love, and it’s genuine.” I think it’s interesting because the whole show, in a sense, is about what people worship.

It’s kind of funny and great to me that...one of the angriest, darkest characters in the show, Laura, what she worships ends up being love, which I think is kind of cool because I think she so easily could have just been the sad, lost wife. I’m really glad that she’s not. I definitely wouldn’t be playing her if that was the case.

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What is Laura’s purpose now? 

I think Laura’s purpose after she comes back from the dead...is to find Shadow, to be able to tell him that, in fact, she does love him and she wants to be with him. I think the broader purpose is to protect him and watch over him, but I’m not sure she quite realises that yet. I don’t think it’s really until the end of the season that she realises that that’s her bigger purpose. I think her motivations, all the way up until the final episode, are fairly selfish. She just wants him back, and I think she gets increasingly frustrated by the fact that she can’t have him back. Again, she has very little self-awareness and very little empathy. 

It’s an interesting moment for her at least, when, at the end of that scene when they see each other in the motel room, she says, “Are you still mine, Puppy?” and he says, “No.” I don’t think she’s even heartbroken; I think she’s just confused. She’s like, “Yes, you are. You’re mine, you always have been. What are you talking about?” I think it’s really fun to play a character like that, because she’s not heartbroken, she’s not pining, she’s sort of just like, “You’re mine and you love me, so come here and love me.” I think it gives me room to do things that I’ve never done in a role before. It’s a really interesting, fun thing to play with, and it’s also a character that I don’t think I’ve ever seen before.

Bryan Fuller on Neil Gaiman's bestseller

How do you turn a novel into a TV show? Bryan Fuller, one of the American Gods’ showrunners, tells us what drove him to take on the challenge of developing it from paper to screen.

The Importance of Coins to Shadow

The Importance of Coins to Shadow

Ricky Whittle on the importance of coins in the show, and the process of learning the roll.

Why are coin tricks important to Shadow?

The coin tricks are funny because the more we learn about Shadow, the more we learn how special he is. He drifts towards these coin tricks and later on we reveal that he doesn’t need to trick anyone. The power is already within him to do real stuff, but obviously, that’s not something you’ll find out until later on. For now, it’s kind of that link to the other side. The illusions and the manipulations.


So, it keeps his mind busy and it allows him to focus?

Yes. The coins, in prison they kept him busy, they kept his mind focused. When he gets nervous or anxious it calms him. We see Shadow on numerous occasions, where things get a little bit crazy, reverting to his coin to soothe his nerves. A coin trick that I took two months to master. It took me forever. It was so hard, and then when we got here they said they could’ve just CGI’ed  it, so time well spent. 


So, you learnt the roll?

I learnt the roll. I went onto YouTube and I started off with the Liberty dollar.  The art department gave me the Liberty dollar, and I was there for a couple of  hours a day, just learning a roll. Once I got that nailed, I got to set and they said, “Oh, we’re going to give you a slug, because you wouldn't have a Liberty dollar in prison. So, here’s a new thing.” It’s impossible. It’s completely different. So, I had to relearn it with a different size and weight coin, and I also have to do it with a moon coin...so it’s been tough. I’ve been in training.

Ricky Whittle on Working With Special Effects

Ricky Whittle on Working With Special Effects

What’s it like working with special effects? 

It’s exciting, but you’re working in a set and an environment that you have no idea about. They can only really tell you bits and bobs. So, they’ll be like, “That tennis ball right there, it’s a buffalo. So, they’re just saying, “Okay, the buffalo’s coming around the tree,” and you’re just watching a tennis ball. You’ve got no idea what you’re looking at. You become a child. You basically have to revert back to childhood and make-believe and really go there. Just use that creativity.  

It can be very tough because you don’t really know what you’re working with. Sometimes your reactions can be too big, sometimes they can be too small. You know, you’re not freaked out enough or you’re freaked out too much. So, it’s a game of trust with the directors and the producers. You’ve got to use a lot of communication, and I like to know exactly what I'm going to be looking at and what I'm going to be working with so that we can get those performance levels right.  

Tell me about some of the sets that you guys have built here.  

We’ve got some incredible sets. The World Tree was pretty fantastic. It wasn’t as extravagant as the trailer suggests, and that will appear in the show, but the tunnel leading to it was fantastic. If I had woken up in that tunnel, I would’ve thought I was in the middle of nowhere, not in a studio in Toronto. The sets have been really fantastic. For a roadshow that primarily shoots on location, we’ve had to build a lot of sets for two or three days and then just scrap them, and I'm just like, “Are you serious? That’s some serious dedication and creativity that goes into these pieces.” They really are fantastic and I challenge you to try and figure out which are real and which aren’t.  

Can you describe Technical Boy’s limo, the inside?  

Technical Boy’s limo is pretty impressive. It’s a collection of cylinder pieces that, kind of, telescopes in and out, so it’s like an accordion. With a chair at one end and a chair at the other end, and they manage to make a mechanical machine that pushes this limo up and down, so it’s very unnerving. If you get sea sick you might not want to sit in this limo because it’s just constantly coming backwards and forwards, it’s very confusing, but very futuristic.  

What Does Laura See?

What Does Laura See?

Emily Browning talks about how Laura sees things once she’s dead – both literally and philosophically.

How does Laura see things, visually?

Some moments of certain scenes are shot as Laura’s point of view. I think [they use] like infrared photography, where all of the warmth is sort of sucked out of an image and it’s a lot of greyish, blueish, white, cold tones. That’s how Laura sees the world after she’s died, but then Shadow, when he comes into her field of vision, he’s the only thing that is warm, and golden, and glowing. Whenever there’s a Laura scene after she’s died, you can always see her sort of staring off into the distance because she can see his light and so she knows when she’s getting closer to him…That’s what she’s chasing throughout the whole series, I suppose. She never really shares that with anyone that that’s what she sees, but...that’s her purpose...to get to that and to possess that.

Does Laura still feel emotions now that she’s dead? 

I think the interesting thing about Laura is that she didn’t really feel very much emotion when she was alive. She was sort of cut off from her own feelings. She felt frustration, and anger, and boredom, I suppose. You know that feeling when you want to jump out of your skin? There’s a low level of that in Laura at all times when she’s alive. It’s this unrest in her that she wants something, but she just really has no idea what it is and she can’t be bothered looking for it too hard. 

Laura - How Laura Sees image

I think, funnily enough, once she dies, it’s almost like through the course of the season she’s learning to feel things that she never really felt before. One of my favourite moments is when she’s watching Salim pray. In her life, she always thought that religion was ridiculous. She was like a true atheist: when you die, you’re dead and you rot. Then, obviously, once she comes back to life, she learns that there is something else. She’s still not entirely sure what it is, but it isn’t as simple as she thought it was. This moment when she’s watching Salim pray is the first time that she actually empathises with the idea of worshipping something bigger than yourself, because she’s started to feel that herself because now her God is love.  

Even though she doesn’t necessarily know how to express it and she doesn’t come across as a particularly loving person, that is what she’s trying to find, and to hold onto, and to make sense of. I think seeing Salim pray…I think there’s something beautiful about it to her, which I don’t think she would admit to anyone else, but it’s sort of her learning, just learning about the idea of loving something outside of yourself.

Ricky Whittle on Training For Fight Scenes

Ricky Whittle on Training For Fight Scenes

“I trained for two months before this show. I had to put on 26lbs. So, Fremantle took me to Unbreakable gym in Los Angeles, and I worked with Brett Bartholomew and Jay Gazer. It’s an intense training regime that involved 4000 calories a day, four hours of gym every day, and we did it. We put on 26lbs. We were training alongside NFL players and MMA fighters.  

It’s been tough to maintain that throughout filming, but it’s been a lot of fun. A lot of stunts. We have an incredible stunt co-ordinator in Branko Racki, and he has a wonderful team that have  helped us throughout the Mad Sweeney Shadow fights, the Shadow and the Children fights in the field. Even being hung from a tree, it’s his responsibility to make sure I'm safe. I have a stunt double in Jason Gosbee, who is awesome. He’s done huge things. Suicide Squad’s his most recent film. There’s a whole team. It really does take a village, and I feel very blessed to have a great team behind me.”

Pablo Schreiber on Creating the Beat Up Look

Pablo Schreiber on Creating the Beat Up Look

Sweeney gets banged up in just about every scene. You must spend a lot of time in make-up, can you tell us about that process?  

I spend a lot of time in make-up, but it's only partially because of the fact that I get banged around all the time. I spend a lot of time in make-up, because I, obviously, don't have red hair or a red beard. So the wig takes quite some time and then painting all my beard red takes a fair amount of time as well. And then we have to put on all these cuts. Most of the damage to him takes place in the first three episodes, but then we establish that look. And, because this series takes place over the course of a week or nine days, none of his cuts have time to heal, so he's got those cuts that he has from the first three episodes through the rest of the series. So, yes, there's a fair amount of time in hair and make-up, but it's fun. I really love the uniqueness of the look of this character, so I'm willing to sit and suffer through it a little while.

Inside The World

Inside The World

Bryan and Michael Take Us Through the Making of Each Episode

Warning: Spoilers. Juicy details of how the show was created will be revealed - and some storylines too. 

Inside The World: The Bone Orchard

Bryan Fuller and Michael Green take us into the world of making 'The Bone Orchard'. Talking us through Shadow's premonitions, THAT scene with Bilquis, and the anatomy of the Viking scene.

Inside The World: The Secret of Spoons

Bryan Fuller and Michael Green take us into the world of making episode 2 - 'The Secret of Spoons' telling us what the name is all about and what their hopes were for the slave ship scene with Mr. Nancy.

Inside The World: Head Full of Snow

Episode three is multi-layered. In this 'Inside The World' Bryan and Michael talk about creating an episode where we see Shadow's first experience with God-like powers, a powerful gay storyline, and one woman's acceptance of death versus another woman's rejection of it.

Inside The World: Git Gone

How did they film Laura with one arm? Why's it called 'Git Gone'? And why did they go so 'off-book'? Michael and Bryan explain all...

Inside the World: Lemon Scented You

Michael and Bryan on the making of 'Lemon Scented You'. We hear them talk about their first meeting with Crispin Glover and how that set the tone for Mr. World. And why creating the Laura and Mad Sweeney partnership was so exciting.

Inside The World: A Murder of Gods

"How do you put a volcano in the hands of your worshipers? Well you give them a gun." Michael Green and Bryan Fuller talk us through the making of episode 6. 

Inside The World: A Prayer for Mad Sweeney

The showrunners tell us why they chose Emily Browning to play Essie McGowan, and the crucial role of the wardrobe department for this episode.

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News

Swipe right to find out what's been going on in the world of American Gods.

American Gods Origins

Take a trip back to Iceland with Neil Gaiman, as he reveals the origins of his epic story.

What People Are Saying

What People Are Saying

Reviews of the Series

“It's never less than compelling, offering an innovative, fantastical skew on the American immigrant narrative, and a visual feast throughout. If Fuller and Green maintain the sky-high quality of these first two episodes, this will be something very special.”

Empire

“It is a wholly unique drama with a clear sense of identity. It’s a fantastic entry in the list of shows that give no care to the whims of pretentious awards culture…It is what it wants to be. It is a show to be reckoned with.” 

Forbes

“Fuller uses American Gods to create an ironic hero’s journey epic, a big saga fantasy a la Game of Thrones or The Walking Dead that casts shade on the genre and transforms our country’s checkered history and high-low culture into a richly subversive mythology.

…I was consistently engrossed. The characters, the concept, the deeply considered filmmaking captured my imagination…I’m fascinated to see where Shadow’s anti-hero odyssey leads, which side of this American Ragnarok he chooses, or if he rejects the gods and bidding to bind his mind, heart and soul once and for all.”

Entertainment Weekly

“A dramatic, cinematic exploration of mythology and migration, pushing the bar of "prestige television" up yet another impressive notch.”

The Telegraph

Do-not-miss television lived large on the big-picture topics and themes of our time as old-world deities and new-world manifestations spar and war across the American cultural tundra… 

American Gods may also be the best thing Fuller or Green have ever done – and those guys were behind NBC’s Hannibal and the R-rated blockbuster Logan, respectively.

One of the best new shows of 2017 in my book, the series directed by David Slade, Floria Sigismondi and Craig Zobel is…a genre-busting and glorious buddy road show with McShane’s Mr. Wednesday and Whittle’s just-out-of-prison Shadow Moon heading down the interstate of the impossible and hidden. However, also at its deep ensemble-coiled heart of myths and the men and women who believe they master them, this American Gods has a love story, expanded characters, cops, robbers, dead celebs and legitimately deep thoughts baked in to bring to life the core American conversations of race, faith, immigration and civil rights.

…Whatever else you may be worshiping on the small screen…you need to convert to American Gods.”


Deadline

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How to watch

American Gods airs exclusively on STARZ in the US, and on Amazon Prime Video outside of the US. Swipe right to find out how you can watch it where you are. 

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